Saturday, May 14, 2016

Long-Range Planning

The tallest trees in North America east of the Rocky Mountains are the tulip trees (Liriodendron tulipifera), to which I am particular. One of our sites is characterized by several tall, lovely tulip trees, while my primary worksite, to my knowledge, had no tulip trees. A couple of years ago, I decided to remedy this deficiency, and planted a handful of tulip tree seeds onsite. The seeds take a while to germinate, but my little experiment finally paid off- here's the larger of the two:




With luck and the right weather conditions, in fifty years, this is going to be a giant, beautiful shade tree, even if I'm not around to benefit from sitting under it.

6 comments:

Nasreen Iqbal said...

Very nice. You're changing your corner of the world!

Big Bad Bald Bastard said...

They are really beautiful trees, and they are native to the area- I'm just spreading the wealth from one worksite to another.

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© said...

Three of four redbuds I planted have decent leaf growth. One is just starting to show signs.

Need more sun, had enough rain.
~

Smut Clyde said...

One can only hope that Bambi doesn't eat them.

Smut Clyde said...

No daobado trees? no deodars?

Big Bad Bald Bastard said...

Three of four redbuds I planted have decent leaf growth. One is just starting to show signs.

Excellent, can't have too many redbuds.

One can only hope that Bambi doesn't eat them.

Oddly enough, we don't get a lot of deer at this one particular site while the other ones teem with them. Every once in a while, we get one coming around and tea-leafing.

No daobado trees? no deodars?

I really wanted a continent-spanning banyan, but I don't have a morel to help me achieve this goal.